Keep the camera rolling: College Now students learn about broadcast news from the BronxNet studio.

By: Justin Vega and Yekania Herrand

During a visit to the BronxNet Studio, a group of aspiring journalists picked up numerous tips from the people behind the production of BronxNet.

BronxNet, available on channel 67 on cable and 33 on Verizon Fios, features a series of entertaining shows as well as serious shows from Monday to Friday.The dark room was overlooked by the lights above as many interns, guests and producers were preparing for the show to air. The director, Jnelsy Paula, counted down the seconds left and the show was live. The host, Javier E. Gomez , talked to a variation of guests and simultaneously informed viewers of what’s going on internationally and locally.

Gomez himself even offered up a few words on his role describing what to do when a guest is taking up too much time, “ be respectful, courteous and classy.” Gomez also adds that body language is important and also to be “looking for a break in their talking.”

In the visit to BronxNet, students where shown a live production of the show “Open” hosted by Gomez and saw what it was like to work behind the scenes of a live production. The aspiring journalists learned that there was a countdown and it’s someone’s responsibility to keep track of time and use gestures to inform the host while on air.

Marisa White the youth media coordinator says there are internships available at the BronxNet studio throughout the year. According to these internships can teach “How to focus a camera, the right questions to ask…” and describes the experience similar to “as if you were on the field.”

White also gave advice to the students visiting, telling them to “be assertive” and told a story about how when the profession of broadcast news was much more male dominated in number. She described how a Canadian News Crew of all women was reported on and then when her and another girl were working on set someone commented that they had a Canadian News Crew. She claimed it was a “dig” at the girls working and with this in mind urged the girls in the group to not be intimidated by the males and work hard to get ahead.

19 ­year old Nialaney Rodriguez used to take some classes at the Lehman College in her senior year in order to accelerate her studies. Rodriguez took a recess that lasted a couple of months but returned to the Campus and is now working as a director for the BronxNet at a very early age. Helen Greenburg, the associate producer, mentions that it’s better to start at an early age because it gives you more opportunities and what could’ve taken Rodriguez ten years to do took her much less because she started early.

There are two major parts to the studio, upstairs and downstairs. Everyone who is upstairs has to make sure the audio works correctly, since It’s “the most important thing in a show” according to William Guzman one of the workers in the control room. The microphones are checked at least three times before the show initiates and even then they might malfunction and have to be fixed right away.There are three big monitors that are easy to see by everyone in the room. One monitor is used to see the preview, another to see the program and the last monitor projects live shows. Downstairs, individuals work with in-studio cameras and capture the host and guests with three different cameras that have various functions.
After a few final tips such as remembering to lock your camera so it doesn’t start drifting, remembering to zoom and focus an knowing what camera you’re on, one of the workers sent us off with advice regarding our future.

“Follow your heart, what you want to do,” said Mojeed Amusa.

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